Author Archive for bobbertsch

Showing Our Impact: A WDinExt Podcast

Cooperative Extension is making a difference, but does it show?

I talked with Dena Wise from The University of Tennessee Extension about that very question. Dena authored the Journal of Extension commentary, “Evaluating Extension Impact on a Nationwide Level: Focus on Programs or Concepts?

4-H LIFE: A WDinExt Podcast

I’m embarrassed to admit I had thought little about the needs of children with an incarcerated parent. I had never thought about Cooperative Extension’s ability to help those kids until I found out about the 4-H LIFE program.

My colleagues in the eXtension Educational Technology Network brainstormed a list of potential guests for the podcast, and Lynna Lawson’s name was on it. Lynna helps lead 4-H LIFE, a program for children of offenders and their families, in Missouri. After an emotional and eye-opening review of the work 4-H LIFE is doing, I couldn’t wait to talk with her.

Here’s our conversation.

Maker Movement, Horticulture Fusion: A WDinExt Podcast

Dave Francis is helping to lead the maker movement within Cooperative Extension. His 2016 eXtension Fellowship project, “Maker Movement, Horticulture Fusion” focuses on the connection between the maker movement and local, small scale agriculture.

Dave also co-authored the Journal of Extension articles, “Extension and the Maker Movement” and “4-H and the Maker Movement.”

We had a great conversation about the maker movement, Cooperative Extension, hipsters, horticulture and more. Enjoy!

Examining eXtension: A WDinExt Podcast

First, an apology. I’m sorry for the recent radio silence. The holidays and a family-wide cold/flu epidemic have me well behind. So far behind, that I am just now posting this interview that was recorded last month.

Cayla Taylor, a program coordinator at Iowa State University, talked with me about the Journal of Extension article, “Examining eXtension: Diffusion, Disruption, and Adoption Among Iowa State University Extension and Outreach Professionals,” which she co-authored with Greg Miller.

I think it brings up some interesting discussions about eXtension and its current rate of adoption among Extension professionals.

What do you think? Is eXtension being used in your state? Do you think the number of Extension professionals using eXtension tolls is a good measure of its success? Share your thoughts in the comments. Thanks!

Podcast Exchange: A WDinExt Podcast

The latest Working Differently in Extension podcast is a testament to working out loud. Justin Thomas, a family and consumer science agent with University of Tennessee Extension, gave the small gift of gratitude to Jamie Seger. Jamie, Program Director, Educational Technology, Ohio State University Extension, and Paul Hill, Extension Assistant Professor, Utah State University Extension, wrote the article, “The Future of Extension Leadership Is Soft Leadership,” for the Journal of Extension. Justin emailed Jamie to express his appreciation for the article and invited Jamie to appear on his podcast, “Blue Ribbons & Boots.”

Then it was Jamie’s turn. Since Justin said he had a podcast, she decided to introduce him to me. In network building that’s called, “closing the triangle.” Jamie’s connection with Justin forms one edge of the triangle, and her connection with me forms another. Jamie closed the triangle by connecting Justin to me to form the final edge.

I’m glad she did. Justin and I connected for an informal conversation about our podcasts, and agreed to an exchange program. Justin would appear as a guest on WDinExt, and I would join Justin on “Blue Ribbons & Boots.” I got the first shot. Age before beauty, I guess.

Be sure out check out Justin’s podcast on Facebook, iTunes, and/or Spreaker.

Here’s my conversation with Justin. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

Effective Community-Engaged Outreach: A WDinExt Podcast

Sara Axtell and Kari Smalkoski are two of the authors of the Journal of Extension article, “One Size Does Not Fit All: Effective Community-Engaged Outreach Practices with Immigrant Communities.” When I first read the article, I immediately connected it to my interest in collective action networks. Community-engaged outreach practices prioritize relationship building, reciprocity and two-way sharing of knowledge. All of those priorities have a place in a networked approach to problem solving as well.

Cooperative Extension needs to do a better job of engaging the public, not just as audience members, but as co-learners and co-creators. As Sara said in the podcast, we need to think about where the ideas for our programs come from, what issues we are trying to address and about “partnering with communities and engaging with communities way before a program starts.” Sara continued, we need to “remember that communities have their own priorities that might be different than our priorities.” When we create programs first, without including the community in that creation, it’s difficult to think of the community as anything other than audience, a group to be talked at and marketed to.

Photo credit: courtesy Ramsey County Minnesota on Flickr, https://flic.kr/p/9wsiYi 

Innovation in Extension: A WDinExt Podcast

Over the past several weeks I’ve talked with members Jamie Seger and Paul Hill, director Keith Smith about the Extension Committee on Organization and Policy’s (ECOP) Innovation Task Force.

When I spoke with Innovation Task Force members Bradd Anderson and Hunter McBrayer, I wanted to keep the conversation more general. Bradd and Hunter have really valuable insights into innovation in Extension. I hope you enjoy our conversation.

Turning the Tables on Me: A WDinExt Podcast

When I was looking for a way to mark the 100th episode of “Working Differently in Extension,” I reached out to the readers of this blog and my Twitter followers.

Steve Judd first shared the idea of turning the tables and having someone interview me. I had mixed feelings. On one hand, I’m a bit of an introvert. On the other hand, I love to hear myself talk, as many of you know. It’s pretty hard for me to judge the final product, but I certainly had a lot of fun in the process.

Thanks to Connie Hancock and Paul Hill for volunteering to be the guest interviewers for this episode. Thanks to Julie Kuehl, my co-producer for the first 20 episodes. Thanks to all the guests who shared their time, their work and a bit of themselves. Most of all, thanks to each of you who have listened to and supported the podcast over the years.

Getting Growers to Go Digital: A WDinExt Podcast

Cooperative Extension has created many decision support tools in spreadsheet, websites and apps, but are people actually using these tools?

Wendy Johnson and Brian McCornack from Kansas State University looked into the acceptance of these kind of applications and shared their findings in their Journal of Extension article, “Getting Growers to Go Digital: The Power of a Positive User Experience.”

We talked about technology adoptions, especially among crop producers, in the conversation below.

Dr. Chelsey Ahrens: A WDinExt Podcast

We’ve been flirting with Snapchat at NDSU Extension Service. We’ve created some on-demand geofilters for events, but we don’t have ant NDSU Extension Snapchat accounts.

Dr. Chelsey A. Ahrens, Specialty Livestock/Youth Education Specialist with University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service,  has fully embraced Snapchat for her Arkansas 4-H Livestock program. I talked about how she is using Snapchat and other social media to reach 4-H participants and their families.